Why you should have your singles remixed?

The purpose of remixing is to give the main elements of the song (most of the time the vocals) a brand new identity, that could take your name even further than the original version could. Close to the remix concept is that of a “mashup“, when elements of your original or remixed song are blended together with different elements of another song or multiple other songs (Madeon – “Pop Culture” would be a great example, since it mixed elements from a dozen songs). Most of the times, when the radio edits of the official singles are not that “dancefloor” friendly (think pop ballads or maybe future chill), a club remix version is kind of mandatory, since a dj should keep his playlist sound pretty balanced and, in order to achieve that, the sound of the songs that he is playing should not drop in intensity from one song to another (think how the people would react if after an EDM banger like Avicii or David Guetta would follow the original version of any of the Adele’s song).

Remixing is one of the best tool for promotion,

by giving a song a completely new sound and making that song interesting to a completely new audience.

Let’s take Enrique Iglesias‘ smashing hit “Bailando“, for example. Even dough it was a airplayed all over the world, for a specific part of the public (including some of our music producers ? ), the song would still feel like being too “cheesy” sounding. So that was why we decided remixing it in the mighty genre of drum and bass, by building new elements around the accapella version of the song (no other element from the backing track of the original version of the song was used):

There are countless examples of songs that became popular thanks to their remixes, and not their original versions, like: Likke LiFollow rivers (The Magician remix), Mike PosnerI took a pill in Ibiza (Seeb remix), Lana Del Rey“Summertime Sadness” (The Cedric Gervais remix), etc.

Most of the times, when the radio edits of the official singles are not that “dancefloor” friendly (think pop ballads or maybe future chill), a club remix version is kind of mandatory, since a dj should keep his playlist sound pretty balanced and, in order to achieve that, the sound of the songs that he is playing should not drop in intensity from one song to another (think how the people would react if after an EDM banger like Avicii or David Guetta would follow the original version of any of the Adele’s song).

How much does a producer charge for remixing a single?

The answer for that questions is not a straightforward one. It definitely depends on the notoriety of the producer, of the artist that ask for the remix, and, of course, for the complexity of the remix itself (remixing a song might take several weeks of full day studio time to get it right).There were singles that we remixed for free just because we liked the original song, but since most of the times we are completely changing the sound of a single by keeping only the vocals (and few other elements, if desired) and building a totally new orchestration around it (sometimes we even require the artist to re-record the vocals at a different tempo), this involves some studio time, so a remix might start from around few hundred dollars and might get to few thousands, when a lot of edits are requested by the client/label/djs, etc.
You should definitely contact us regarding a quotation for a remix of a song! We tend to come up with pleasant suprises! ?

What do we need for remixing a song?

Multitrack of the song would be ideal (separated channels with drums, bass, vocals, etc.), but we could definitely start with only the vocals only, then adding the chord progression and start adding a certain sound that we are looking for. We might offer different sugestions regarding the arrangement and the sound of that particular remix and we could also make several remixes in different musical genres (for example, a dubstep remix and a future bass remix would definitely expose your single to totally different audiences!) The concept of remixing became so popular, that Native Instruments (company dealing with audio production and Dj hardware and software) introduced the “Stems” technology, so that everyone could get access to your tracks.

Should you make the accapellas or multi track versions of your songs freely available for download, so that anyone could make a remix?

Our advice would be to make them available only by request, and send them only based on a confidentiality agreement.  Also, you should release only the remixes that have been quality approved.  A bad sounding remix could ruin your image, and we’re speaking from our experience in the past, when we have organized remix contests for some of our clients, only to find out that very few of them were meeting our quality expectations, in the end. The worst part is that, since the digital software allows to anyone to combine sound snippets nowadays, most of the times there were the “wannabee producers” that got the time to make a free remix and, since they were not experienced enough, they came up with wrong chord progressions, out of sync vocal editing and crappy mixing and mastering. Even worse was that they were pretty proud of their work and it took us a hard time to convince them to get them down.

Could be the acoustic version of a song considered to be a remix?

Even though remixing is most of the times associated with dancefloor friendly, groove driven productions, there is a clearly increasing demand in the acoustic versions, with acts like Boys Avenue making billions of views on youtube  by making acoustic versions of popular songs. Don’t hesitate to send us an email if you would like for us to make an acoustic version backing track of your song (piano or guitar). Also, if you’d like to make a cover version of a popular song, and you need the instrumental to be transposed from male to female version (or viceversa) or maybe you need it to be transposed to a key that your vocal range would benefit the most, have a look to our page dedicated to making custom backing tracks, beats, orchestration and instrumentals or the one on custom songwriting and co-writing and you’ll definitely find examples of our portfolio that would be relevant to your requests.

One of the latest examples of our work on making an acoustic version of a song would be the one that we made for Irina Rimes‘ latest single, “Iubirea noastra muta“.

One of our latest examples of remixes would be the Demi Lovato – Sorry Not Sorry Remix (Future House) , among others. Down below (left) you could listen to the original (radio edit) version, the one that gets a lot of airplay on the local radio stations and next to it (right) you could listen to the acoustic version that we came up with for Loredana, on our first collaboration ever, including recording her vocals in the studio, and also basic mixing and mastering.

Some other examples of remixes that we’ve made

Another dnb remixing task that we were recently ingaged in was for celebrating 20 years of Class‘ first single, “A, dui, doina“. The music video was made in partnership with Grolsch and it featured Alexandra Piscupescu, 6 times Romanian National champion (rhythmic gymnast). Down below you can listen to both original version (left) and our drum and bass remix (right).